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What is a Network Switch?

What is a Network Switch?

What is a Network Switch?

A network switch (also called switching hub, bridging hub, officially MAC bridge) is a computer networking device that connects devices together on a computer network by using packet switching to receive, process, and forward data to the destination device.

A network switch is a multiport network bridge that uses hardware addresses to process and forward data at the data link layer (layer 2) of the OSI model. Some switches can also process data at the network layer (layer 3) by additionally incorporating routing functionality. Such switches are commonly known as layer-3 switches or multilayer switches.

Switches for Ethernet are the most common form of network switch. The first Ethernet switch was introduced by Kalpana in 1990. Switches also exist for other types of networks including Fibre Channel, Asynchronous Transfer Mode, and InfiniBand.

Unlike less advanced repeater hubs, which broadcast the same data out of each of its ports and let the devices decide what data they need, a network switch forwards data only to the devices that need to receive it

What is a Router?

What is a Router?

What is a Router?

router is a networking device that forwards data packets between computer networks. Routers perform the traffic directing functions on the Internet. Data sent through the internet, such as a web page or email, is in the form of data packets. A packet is typically forwarded from one router to another router through the networks that constitute an internetwork until it reaches its destination node.

A router is connected to two or more data lines from different networks. When a data packet comes in on one of the lines, the router reads the network address information in the packet to determine the ultimate destination. Then, using information in its routing table or routing policy, it directs the packet to the next network on its journey.

The most familiar type of routers are home and small office routers that simply forward IP packets between the home computers and the Internet. An example of a router would be the owner’s cable or DSL router, which connects to the Internet through an Internet service provider (ISP). More sophisticated routers, such as enterprise routers, connect large business or ISP networks up to the powerful core routers that forward data at high speed along the optical fiber lines of the Internet backbone. Though routers are typically dedicated hardware devices, software-based routers also exist.

Razer Gets Into Networking

Razer Gets Into Networking

RAZER GETS INTO NETWORKING

Razer’s encroachment into every part of your PC that’s not inside your PC continues with the Sila, a luxurious $250 router built with gamers in mind. And not just PC gamers; Razer designed the Sila for seriously fast gaming over Wi-Fi, because nobody wants ethernet cables strewn across their living room.

The tri-band AC3000 router—one 2.4GHz band at up to 400Mbps, and two 5GHz bands at up to 1,733Mbps and 866Mbps—bristles with nine antennas under the hood and relies on smart software-management tools to optimize your gaming experience. Razer’s FasTrack engine prioritizes gaming bandwidth when your network starts getting clogged, and the Quality of Service tool is smart enough to identify and prioritize each of the major gaming consoles. Razer told us FasTrack will learn which applications are games over time and shift their load automatically. You can also enable a “Gaming mode” that reserves a set slice of your bandwidth for gaming alone.

The Sila also utilizes “Multi-Channel ZeroWait DFS” technology to discover the least congested Wi-Fi bands in your area and switch to them—a boon if you’re in a crowded apartment building. It also lets you tap into non-public Wi-Fi bands. The technology builds on the back of the Portal router from Ignite Design Labs, which Razer partnered with to create the Sila.