Learn How To Clear Browser Cache On Laptops

Learn How To Clear Browser Cache On Laptops

Lear how to clear browser cache on laptops

Learn How To Clear Browser Cache on Laptops.

Do you remember the last time you’ve cleared the cache on your MacBook or other Apple device? If you never have or it’s been longer than you can remember, it’s not a bad idea to set a reminder to perform this simple maintenance task every now and again. Cached files store up in your browsing system whenever you browse the internet. Too many cached files can eventually wreak havoc on your operating system and slow it down over time. No matter which browsing platform you use, cleaning up your browser data only takes a few minutes of your time at most. Follow the guidelines below to learn more about cached files and how to clear browser cache on Mac laptops.

WHAT IS BROWSER CACHE?

Each time you hop on the internet, your laptop downloads and stores browsing cache to spare you time on your next browsing session. This process prevents your device from downloading the same files every time you visit the same webpage. Saved cache files can include videos, images, scripts, and other media files.

WHY CLEAR CACHE ON YOUR MAC?

Cached data helps web pages load more quickly when you visit a site more than once. Unfortunately, too many cached files on your laptop can cause your browsing system to lag over time. Chances are, you won’t need to return to every site you’ve browsed in the past. It’s best to perform routine maintenance by clearing the stored website data out every so often using the processes below.

HOW TO CLEAR BROWSING DATA IN SAFARI

To start, open Safari. Once you’re in your Safari browser, double click on the Safari menu in your drop-down menu bar and select Preferences. Some users prefer holding down Command-Comma(,) as a shortcut to get here.

Next, navigate to the Advanced tab. Check the Show Develop menu box in the menu bar and close out your Preferences window. Then, head back to the menu bar. Click on the Develop menu > Empty Caches. You can also use Command-Option-E as a shortcut.

HOW TO CLEAR BROWSER CACHE IN GOOGLE CHROME

First, open Chrome and click on the three vertical dots in the upper-righthand corner. Then, choose Settings. Once you’re in the Settings menu, click on Privacy and security on the left side of your screen.

To proceed, select Clear browsing data. Under the Time range, you’ll have the option of clearing data anywhere from the last hour, last 24 hours, last seven days, last four weeks, or All time. Ensure the Browsing history check box is selected, along with the Cached image and files box, before clicking on Clear Data.

HOW TO EMPTY CACHE IN FIREFOX

Begin by navigating to the Browser History tab in your menu bar, and click on Clear Recent History. Like in Chrome, you’ll have a time range to pick and choose from. Once you’ve chosen your time range, double-check that the box next to cache is selected. To finish, click on OK in the bottom right corner.

Cache clearing can differ slightly depending on your specific laptop and web browser. Get in touch with PC Expert Services for more troubleshooting tips and advice. From regular tune-ups to file cleaning and more, we’re here to help you prolong the life of your Apple device!

Five great ways to strengthen your password security

Five great ways to strengthen your password security

A major password hack is in the news every few weeks; most times, the main reason is (simply) weak passwords. Don’t want to be a victim of the next hack? In this blog, we’ll take a look at five easy steps that you can take to make your passwords stronger.
Five great ways to strengthen your password security

Many people are still using the simple passwords they created in the early 2000s. Getting hacked wasn’t such a huge concern for organizations and their employees. However, as we become even more connected as a society, there is an increase in the risk that threat actors pose. For example, quoted in our article regarding the role of remote access in cyberattacks, brute force guessing of passwords was a factor in 78% of all ransomware attacks.

A simple look at the most common passwords in 2021 should make any security expert’s skin crawl. We have a problem when 123456 (and the “more secure” 123456789) are the only ones more used than qwerty. Nobody wants to (or even can) remember the long random letter and number combinations. After all, it’s much quicker to tap in the same old password for everything – and to be very clear, this is a practice you shouldn’t be doing under any circumstances!

The most common passwords haven’t changed much. Their ongoing prevalence makes it a cakewalk for hackers to break in. So what can your company and your employees do about it?

1. Use a password manager.
2. Use Multi-Factor Authentication everywhere.
3. Don’t share passwords, no matter what.
4. Check for previous hacks and delete your old accounts.
5. Avoid public Wi-Fi.

Many people are still using the simple passwords they created in the early 2000s. Getting hacked wasn’t such a huge concern for organizations and their employees. However, as we become even more connected as a society, there is an increase in the risk that threat actors pose. For example, quoted in our article regarding the role of remote access in cyberattacks, brute force guessing of passwords was a factor in 78% of all ransomware attacks.

A simple look at the most common passwords in 2021 should make any security expert’s skin crawl. We have a problem when 123456 (and the “more secure” 123456789) are the only ones more used than qwerty. Nobody wants to (or even can) remember the long random letter and number combinations. After all, it’s much quicker to tap in the same old password for everything – and to be very clear, this is a practice you shouldn’t be doing under any circumstances!

The most common passwords haven’t changed much. Their ongoing prevalence makes it a cakewalk for hackers to break in. So what can your company and your employees do about it?

1. Use a password manager.
2. Use Multi-Factor Authentication everywhere.
3. Don’t share passwords, no matter what.
4. Check for previous hacks and delete your old accounts.
5. Avoid public Wi-Fi.

1. Use a password manager

 

Passwords are a pretty vulnerable security measure, but they’re unavoidable in most cases. You can, however, take steps to minimize the risk they pose.

A good password manager eliminates the need to create and remember complex passwords. It will generate a random, unique password when needed. You can then save it in an encrypted vault to use whenever you need it. Ideally, all passwords should generate strong, “makes-no-sense-if-you-read-it” combinations.

Not only does this make it harder to crack into your account by brute force, but if one account becomes compromised, your others are still safe.

Users only need to remember the password manager’s password. Make sure it is a strong one that only you know. Some password manager apps can also use your smartphone’s biometric sensors to unlock. Personally, Bitwarden has proved to be a great choice, but there are many great options that your organization can deploy.

2. Use Multi-Factor Authentication everywhere

 

Using a password alone is like locking the doors but leaving all your windows open. You may have closed the easiest route, but the intruder can still get inside with a bit of work.

Most accounts will use multi-factor authentication (MFA). Once you have entered your password, you will get a code/link via text or email with MFA. You can also generate the code in a secure app (or approve the login). You will need to enter it to prove you are the account’s legitimate owner.

From a remote access perspective, MFA is a crucial step in ensuring that safety is at the forefront of remote sessions and that the users connecting to different devices are who they say they are.

While texting or emailing a code is the most common second factor used in MFA, they aren’t the only options. Multi-factor authentication can combine multiple credentials that are unique to the user, such as:

  • Something the user knows – a password or the answer to a pre-set question.
  • Something the user carries to authenticate – a card or key fob.
  • Something unique to the user – a fingerprint or facial recognition.

The benefit of adding a second layer of security is that the password is not enough to access an account. Even if an attacker has it, there is another obstacle to accessing the account. The benefits of MFA being part of your remote access strategy are immense.

And since we were mentioning password managers, make sure that you choose one that uses MFA – enable it and always use it!

3. Don’t share passwords, no matter what

 

While this might be obvious, many hacks happen because users tend to share passwords. And this has started occurring much more often since we all use streaming services. For example, more than a quarter of Netflix’s UK subscribers share their passwords. Since many users are likely to use the same passwords, many hacks are waiting to happen (let’s hope that at least they use MFA on their other accounts).

Additionally, if you can impose a password policy for your users, make it a complex one. Employees might not be pleased when having to change or remember passwords, but the long-term gains and extra security are second to none.

4. Check for previous hacks and delete your old accounts

 

Remember signing up for that random account ten years ago to enter a competition? Neither do we, but did you know that website got hacked in 2015? The more accounts your employees have, the more vulnerable your organization is to external risks – especially if you’ve used the same password everywhere.

You can check if your email address shows up in any data breaches at haveibeenpwned.com and sign up to get an alert when new breaches happen. A seasonal purge of old accounts will remove the burden of potential future attacks, leaving your company feeling more at ease.

5. Avoid public wi-fi

 

The internet has become so integrated with almost every aspect of our lives that in 2016 the UN declared internet access a basic human right. Public Wi-Fi is everywhere and a key player in compromising password security. On top of that, life beyond 2020 means flexible working is here to stay for many companies, indicating employees will have more freedom regarding where they work – from a coffee shop, a commuter train, or even an airport.

However, if you’re concerned about your company’s data security, you might want to advise not to connect every time a Wi-Fi notification pops up. When it comes to public Wi-Fi, there is no way of knowing who may be monitoring the session, from the URLs visited through to the keystrokes that users input.

The best way to browse risk-free is not to use public Wi-Fi, but sometimes it’s unavoidable when the 5G signal is non-existent.

Many reputable VPNs are available if public Wi-Fi is a must, even for smartphones. They will add an extra layer of security to keep data safe, especially for corporate devices.

Completely bulletproof security doesn’t exist. Taking all the steps available to protect data puts your organization in the next best position. If you are using a remote access solution, ensure it is secure and that it offers encryption on all connections, rich session permissions, and granular access control.

Cybercriminals will always look for new ways to weasel their way in, keeping us all on our security toes. It’s for us to make sure that they fail to succeed.

Source: realvnc

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What should I do when a computer freezes or locks up?

What should I do when a computer freezes or locks up?

What should I do when a computer freezes or locks up?

This blog post contains recommendations on what to do if the computer freezes or deadlocks. If your computer has stopped responding, follow the steps below to attempt to get the computer to unfreeze.

Give the computer some time

Wait. Give the computer a few minutes to process. Sometimes a computer may appear to be frozen, but it’s only slow or busy processing a complex task.

Is the computer deadlocked?

See if the computer responds by pressing the Caps Lock key on the keyboard and watching the Caps Lock LED (light) to see if it turns on and off. If the computer can turn on and off Caps Lock, continue to the next step. If nothing happens, the computer is deadlocked, and you must reboot the computer.

End Task the not responding program

See if the computer responds by pressing the Caps Lock key on the keyboard and watching the Caps Lock LED (light) to see if it turns on and off. If the computer can turn on and off Caps Lock, continue to the next step. If nothing happens, the computer is deadlocked, and you must reboot the computer.

If the Task Manager opens, but the mouse is still not working, it may be a problem with mouse’s hardware.

Reboot a frozen computer

If none of the above steps helped, you must reboot the computer. To reboot a frozen computer, press and hold down the power button until the computer turns off. Once the computer is off, wait a few seconds, then turn the computer back on and let it start as normal.

What happens to any work that has not been saved?

Any work that has not been saved is lost when a computer has to be reboot because it is frozen. In some situations, some programs may auto save your work every few minutes. If the program you are using performs this action, you can recover the work up to the last auto saved state.

Resolve hardware or device driver issue

If you tried all steps above and the computer still freezes, there may be defective hardware or a device driver that is not working correctly. A defective hard drive, stick of RAM, video card, or another piece of hardware can cause a computer to freeze. A device driver can also cause a computer to freeze if it is out of date, conflicting with another driver, or not working properly.

If you determine that a defective piece of hardware is causing the freezes, you should replace the hardware right away to prevent further damage to the computer. If a device driver is at fault, download the latest driver from the manufacturer’s website and install it before the computer freezes. Or use another computer to download the driver and try installing the driver on your computer.

If you cannot install the latest driver before the computer freezes, another option is to start the computer in Safe Mode. Once in Safe Mode, you can access Device Manager and uninstall the hardware device corresponding to the device driver that is not working correctly. Then, restart the computer and load into Windows normally. Windows should detect the hardware that you uninstalled and try to reinstall the device driver. This process may be enough to fix the issue, and stop further freezes from occurring. You can also try installing the latest driver at this point, to make sure your computer is up-to-date for that device driver.

You can also try accessing the computer BIOS and disable any hardware that is not working properly, to see if that stops the freezes from occurring. However, you should still replace that hardware, as you may not be able to use your computer fully if the hardware remains disabled.

Take PC to repair shop

If the options above do not work, we recommend taking your computer to PC Expert Services in Irvine and allow us professionally to diagnose and fix the problem.

Why Choose PC Expert Services for Computer Repair?

Why Choose PC Expert Services for Computer Repair?

Why Choose PC Expert Services?

PC Expert Services has the latest industry certifications and the experience to fix any computer related issues effectively in Irvine, Orange County.

Best Industry Computer Repair Expert

PC Expert Services is Microsoft Certified Professiona, A+ Certified, Network+ Certified, Apple Certified Techician, and a 4 year degree in Electronics.

Fast & Effective Computer Repair

When it comes to your computer repair or laptop repair, PC Expert Services makes sure that your computer repair is completed in a timely manner without any short cuts.

Flat Rate Computer Repair Pricing

PC Expert Services provides Flat Rate Pricing for your computer repair, so that there is no pressure to repair your computer effectively the right way.

Computer Repair Warranty

PC Expert Services provides the best warranty in Irvine for your computer repair. We stand behind our work and we do always what ever we can to make sure your computer repair lasts without any worries.