What is a Network Switch?

What is a Network Switch?

What is a Network Switch?

A network switch (also called switching hub, bridging hub, officially MAC bridge) is a computer networking device that connects devices together on a computer network by using packet switching to receive, process, and forward data to the destination device.

A network switch is a multiport network bridge that uses hardware addresses to process and forward data at the data link layer (layer 2) of the OSI model. Some switches can also process data at the network layer (layer 3) by additionally incorporating routing functionality. Such switches are commonly known as layer-3 switches or multilayer switches.

Switches for Ethernet are the most common form of network switch. The first Ethernet switch was introduced by Kalpana in 1990. Switches also exist for other types of networks including Fibre Channel, Asynchronous Transfer Mode, and InfiniBand.

Unlike less advanced repeater hubs, which broadcast the same data out of each of its ports and let the devices decide what data they need, a network switch forwards data only to the devices that need to receive it

What is a Router?

What is a Router?

What is a Router?

router is a networking device that forwards data packets between computer networks. Routers perform the traffic directing functions on the Internet. Data sent through the internet, such as a web page or email, is in the form of data packets. A packet is typically forwarded from one router to another router through the networks that constitute an internetwork until it reaches its destination node.

A router is connected to two or more data lines from different networks. When a data packet comes in on one of the lines, the router reads the network address information in the packet to determine the ultimate destination. Then, using information in its routing table or routing policy, it directs the packet to the next network on its journey.

The most familiar type of routers are home and small office routers that simply forward IP packets between the home computers and the Internet. An example of a router would be the owner’s cable or DSL router, which connects to the Internet through an Internet service provider (ISP). More sophisticated routers, such as enterprise routers, connect large business or ISP networks up to the powerful core routers that forward data at high speed along the optical fiber lines of the Internet backbone. Though routers are typically dedicated hardware devices, software-based routers also exist.

What is a Search Algorithm?

What is a Search Algorithm?

What is a Search Algorithm?

A search algorithm is a process or set of rules used by search engines to determine the significance of a web page. Algorithms are used to filter, digest and evaluate web pages to ensure search results match a user’s search query.

As the internet has exponentially grown in size, Google has had to become a data filtering machine. To deliver results that match a user’s search query, Google uses a series of complex rules and procedures (i.e algorithms) to find, filter and digest web pages from across the internet for its own “index”. It is this “index” of web pages that Google uses when displaying relevant search results.

Remember, Google is not the internet and instead should be seen as a “gateway”, helping users to find up-to-date and accurate information time and time again. As the “go-to” search engine, Google dominates the industry, processing in excess of 3.5 billion worldwide searches every day! With so much user demand and potential power to make or break websites and businesses, it is clear that investing the time to co-operate and impress Google’s algorithms is a win-win situation for you or your client’s websites.

 

If you are interested in keeping up to date with Google’s latest algorithm updates here are a few resources to bookmark: